The New S-word

There is a particular word that the Obama Administration apparently feels is too provocative for public discourse – that word is “stimulus.”

The President mentioned the word exactly once in his State of the Union address, ditto for the White House Budget, which is 192 pages.  Doing one better, OMB Director Peter Orszag and Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner managed not to utter the term at all in their numerous appearances before Congressional committees this week in defending the budget, even though the lawmakers questioning them constantly referred to the word. However, in each of these cases numerous references were made to the official name of the stimulus — the “Recovery Act.”

Likewise, administration officials calling for more public funds to be pumped into the economy consistently refer to the need for a “jobs bill” as opposed to another “stimulus.” The White House has obviously conceded the messaging battle over the stimulus and has decided that the better part of valor is to regroup and re-market the concept. Many voters feel they have benefitted little from the stimulus; terms like “recovery” and “jobs” are what they want to hear.

Going back to the budget, the release of the President’s budget this week, which is marked by deficits and debt as far as the eye can see, has spawned a great deal of discussion over what will be the effects of growing U.S. debt. Policy Daddy has highlighted some of the pieces that are well worth reading and considering:

David Sanger of the New York Times writes that U.S. debt could hurt its global standing.

Unless miraculous growth, or miraculous political compromises, creates some unforeseen change over the next decade, there is virtually no room for new domestic initiatives for Mr. Obama or his successors. Beyond that lies the possibility that the United States could begin to suffer the same disease that has afflicted Japan over the past decade. As debt grew more rapidly than income, that country’s influence around the world eroded.

Sanger also states, “Mr. Obama has published the 10-year numbers in part, it seems, to make the point that the political gridlock of the past few years, in which most Republicans refuse to talk about tax increases and Democrats refuse to talk about cutting entitlement programs, is unsustainable.”

Similarly, Gerald Seib of the Wall Street Journal warns that mounting debt is a threat to national security.

The U.S. government this year will borrow one of every three dollars it spends, with many of those funds coming from foreign countries. That weakens America’s standing and its freedom to act; strengthens China and other world powers including cash-rich oil producers; puts long-term defense spending at risk; undermines the power of the American system as a model for developing countries; and reduces the aura of power that has been a great intangible asset for presidents for more than a century.

Former CBO Director Douglas Holtz-Eakin and former House Budget Committee Chairman James R. Jones also argued recently that American debt has international implications.

From Afghanistan to China to Copenhagen, the actions of President Barack Obama have international significance. However, the greatest worldwide implications will stem from a domestic issue that he must not ignore: our nation’s mounting government debt. The U.S. has a debt problem, and the world is watching. The administration’s response will dictate not only the standard of living of future generations of Americans, but also their country’s global standing.

In discussing his “Fiscal Democracy Index” in USA Today economist Gene Steuerle contends that unsustainable promises are crowding out the ability of government to undertake any new initiatives to improve the nation or meet the needs of the next generation.

Thanks to decades of promises for ever-higher benefits and low taxes for the indefinite future, there’s now less give in future budgets than at any point in American history. At least profligate Congresses in the past confined their excesses and temporarily large deficits to the current year. Until recently, they didn’t box in the future.

Underscoring all of this, Moody’s warned that the nation’s AAA bond rating is at risk because of debt and slow growth. Dealing with our debt in a thoughtful and forward-looking way must be a national priority.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

One Response to “The New S-word”

  1. William R. Cumming Says:

    Actually don’t think promises will cause the problems to increase. What will cause the problems to increase are the choice or lack of choice of what is a priority or priorities!

    MY simplistic solutions include just use DOD budget as baseline and then give STATE (and AID and OFDA), DHS, Coast Guard, VA, weapons side of Energy Dept., and certain other agencies involved in Homeland Defense and Homeland Security a percentage. Oversight by authorization and budget committees of Congress could determine that correct percentage and not waste everyone’s time. This is not a recommendation for offsetting DOD budget by these amounts but merely to reduce the complexity of the budget process. This could be a two year budget with the alternative years devoted to everything else. Too many committees in Congress each trying to expand their clout over the budget by keeping old programs that are duplicative or should be terminated going, or developing new unneeded programs. In My Opinion (IMO) of course. And could be wrong!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: